Tag:Purdue
Posted on: March 30, 2011 3:52 pm
Edited on: March 30, 2011 4:05 pm
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Source: Painter staying at Purdue

Matt Painter has rejected a contract offer from Missouri and decided to remain at Purdue thanks to a new and extended contract that has been agreed upon in principle, a source told CBSSports.com on Wednesday.

An official announcement is expected soon.

Painter's decision to remain at his alma mater ends a wild few days on the coaching carousel during which Purdue and Missouri both made very public pleas -- Purdue to try to keep him, Missouri to try to take him -- for the man who has been named Big Ten Coach of the Year in three of the past four seasons. Despite those honors -- and five straight NCAA tournament appearances -- Purdue had been paying Painter only $1.3 million annually. That number ranks eighth in the Big Ten and is among the reasons Missouri believed he could be lured from the place where he was tabbed as Gene Keady's replacement before Keady retired in 2005.

Details of Painter's new deal are unclear, but he will receive a significant raise. His staff will also receive notable pay increases and be afforded a budget to operate like a true high-major program, something that was never the case in Painter's first six seasons with the Boilermakers.

Missouri's search for a new coach will now move on to secondary candidates.

Mike Anderson left Missouri for Arkansas last week.
Category: NCAAB
Posted on: March 28, 2011 1:45 pm
Edited on: March 28, 2011 4:10 pm
 

Report: Painter to meet with Missouri officials

Purdue coach Matt Painter will meet with Missouri officials over the next 48 hours about the school's vacant head coaching position, according to a report in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

It is believed that Missouri could offer Painter a contract worth more than $2 million annually. Purdue only pays Painter around $1.3 million a year -- though he'll make around $1.9 million this year because of bonuses earned during this 25-win season, according to the Indianapolis Star. Still, Painter's base salary ranks in the bottom half of the Big Ten.

"Matt wants a situation where he will be able to make a run for a national championship," former Purdue coach Gene Keady told CBSSports.com on Monday. "The administration here has to step up and help him."

That said, Keady added this: "I think he'll stay."

Painter has led Purdue to five straight NCAA tournament appearances and two Sweet 16s in six total seasons. Purdue has finished in the top two of the Big Ten in each of the past four seasons.

Missouri is looking for a coach to replace Mike Anderson.

Anderson left for Arkansas last week.
Category: NCAAB
Posted on: March 11, 2011 3:37 pm
Edited on: March 12, 2011 12:16 am
 

Friday Wrap-up

NEW YORK -- Kemba Walker dominated at Madison Square Garden again.

Tom Izzo suddenly has a dangerous basketball team again.

And Jimmer went Jimmer in a bigtime way.

Here's Friday's Wrap-up to recap a busy day of college basketball.

Best game: Big East semifinals. Connecticut vs. Syracuse. Did you really think it would end in regulation? "I didn't want it to go six overtimes again," said UConn's Kemba Walker, whose brilliance ensured it would not. The Huskies instead closed this one out in the first OT and advanced to Saturday's title game with a 76-71 victory over the Orange two years after the two schools played that six-overtime classic in this same building. Walker finished with 33 points, 12 rebounds, five assists and six steals, then spent some time chatting outside the media room with President Bill Clinton. Meantime, UConn coach Jim Calhoun used part of his postgame press conference to praise his star and highlight, for the 87th time this week, that one Big East coach didn't vote Walker First Team All-Conference. "He's the Most Valuable Player on any team in the country," Calhoun said. "I'm going to keep saying it."
 
Other best game: North Carolina was down double-digits to Miami at the half, at which point I openly wondered whether Larry Drew was back to playing point guard for the Tar Heels. Turns out, he was not. And that was never more obvious than when Kendall Marshall, Drew's more-talented mid-season replacement, drove into the lane in the final seconds of a tie game and found Tyler Zeller all alone under the basket for an easy layup at the buzzer that gave North Carolina a 61-59 win in the ACC quarterfinals. It was a play that capped an incredible run that allowed the Tar Heels to overcome a 19-point deficit in the final 10 minutes. It also reminded me of what Zeller told me about Marshall last week. "He does a lot of things that make our jobs easy," Zeller said. "He can pass you the ball and you just have to lay it up." As Miami now knows, that's exactly right.

Yet another best game: Virginia Tech probably secured an NCAA tournament bid with a 52-51 win over Florida State in the ACC quarterfinals, but the Hokies couldn't celebrate until Derwin Kitchen's shot at the buzzer that initially seemed to give FSU the win was waved off. The officials huddled around a monitor and correctly concluded that the ball was still in Kitchen's hands when time expired, but just barely. It was a wild scene in Greensboro. Seth Greenberg cried and everything.

Team whose dream remained alive: Whether Alabama can get an at-large bid remains debatable because the Crimson Tide have seven losses outside of the top 50, but their 65-59 overtime win against Georgia in the SEC quarters definitely enhanced their case. The Crimson Tide now have four top-50 wins to help offset those troubling losses, and they're at no risk of taking another "bad" loss before Selection Sunday (provided they meet Kentucky in the semifinals). As for Georgia, man, who knows? The Bulldogs have a better body of work than Alabama despite two losses to Alabama. But a bubble team blowing a double-digit second-half lead to a fellow bubble team is never a good final impression to leave with the Selection Committee.

Team whose dream was crushed: Jerry Palm projected Tulsa as the winner of C-USA's automatic bid after UAB lost Thursday, which means Tulsa entered Friday in the Field of 68 here at CBSSports.com. I'll be honest, it just looked weird. But that projection will change as soon as my colleague updates his projections because UTEP beat Tulsa 66-54 in the C-USA quarterfinals and eliminated the Golden Hurricane from NCAA tournament contention. Hey, it was fun while it lasted.

Performance I hope you witnessed: Walker's 33 at MSG was the biggest story of the night ... right up until Jimmer Fredette dropped 33 on New Mexico in the first half and finished with a career-high 52 in BYU's 87-76 win in the Mountain West semifinals. The CBSSports.com National Player of the Year was -- ready for this? -- 22-of-37 from the field, and only one of his points came on a free throw. If the members of the Selection Committee want to do the nation a favor, they'll put BYU and UConn in the same region and give us a possible Jimmer vs. Kemba matchup two weekends from now.

Performance I hope you missed: Wisconsin and Penn State did nothing to help the Big Ten's reputation as a slow and boring basketball league. In fact, they might've cemented the reputation by playing a game in which the winning team scored 36 points and the losing team scored 33. Penn State was the winning team, if you care.

 Five things worth noting

1. Nolan Smith suffered a toe injury in the second half of Duke's 87-71 win over Maryland in the ACC quarterfinals and did not return. Mike Krzyzewski said afterward that he wasn't sure if Smith would be back before the end of the ACC tournament but stressed the most important thing is making sure the ACC Player of the Year is available for the NCAA tournament, which will begin for Duke, presumably, next Friday in Charlotte.

2. Memphis finally looked like a team with a roster built to overwhelm C-USA opponents during a 76-56 win over East Carolina in part because Joe Jackson finally looked like somebody worthy of the nickname "King of Memphis." The McDonald's All-American has gone from a local high school legend to a freshman starter for the Tigers to a part-time reserve in less than a year, and it's been tough on him. But Jackson was tremendous against ECU while scoring a career-high 24 points. He made 8-of-12 field goal attempts, 3-of-3 3-point attempts and 5-of-5 free throw attempts, and now the Tigers are just a win over UTEP away from earning an automatic bid to the NCAA tournament.

3.
Southern California played its Pac-10 semifinal against Arizona without head coach Kevin O'Neill, who was suspended by his athletic director after a Thursday night incident with an Arizona booster. Assistant Bob Cantu coached the Trojans in O'Neill's absence. They lost 67-62 and are almost certainly headed to the NIT.

4. Ohio State entered this week in position to get a No. 1 seed regardless, but that doesn't mean the Buckeyes wanted or needed to lose their Big Ten tournament opener to Northwestern (if only because there's nothing cool about losing a Big Ten tournament opener to Northwestern). Thanks to Jared Sullinger they avoided the upset. The CBSSports.com National Freshman of the Year finished with 20 points and 18 rebounds in OSU's 67-61 overtime win. Worth noting is that Sullinger shot 18 free throws, i.e., just as many as Northwestern's entire team.

5. If you're surprised Tom Izzo has Michigan State operating at a high level then you haven't been paying attention for the past decade. Somehow, someway, this is what Izzo does. Regardless of whether the Spartans are great, good, average or terrible from November to March, by St. Patrick's Day each year Izzo gets them straight. So of course Michigan State will play in the Big Ten semifinals thanks to a 74-56 win over Purdue that took the Spartans off the bubble. They're now guaranteed to make the NCAA tournament. They'll probably make the Sweet 16, just because.

Final thought: Providence fired Keno Davis Friday and folks immediately started trying to explain why this didn't work. Among the common theories was because the Big East school hired him "with just one year of head coaching experience," which is both wrong and silly. Understand this: Davis didn't fail at Providence because he lacked significant prior experience. He failed at Providence because the school decided to hire the country's hottest young coach in April 2008 with little regard to how he fit with the Friars program. Davis was a bad fit -- and I hope Providence realizes that before it lures its next coach. Hire somebody with experience if you want; I'm not saying that's the wrong route. All I'm saying is that projected greatness and fit are way more important than past experience, and you can look elsewhere in the Big East to see it. Pittsburgh hired Jamie Dixon with zero years of head coaching experience while Marquette hired Buzz Williams with one. Things seems to be going well for those two programs, don't they?

Bottom line, what somebody has done at another school is important, sure.

But it's not nearly as important as what you think somebody can do at your school going forward.
Posted on: February 27, 2011 4:55 pm
Edited on: February 27, 2011 5:50 pm
 

If I had to project the field right now ...

... here's how my top four lines would look:

No. 1 seeds: Ohio State, Kansas, Pittsburgh, BYU
No. 2 seeds: Notre Dame, Duke, Purdue, Texas
No. 3 seeds: San Diego State, Wisconsin, Louisville, Syracuse
No. 4 seeds: St. John's, Connecticut, North Carolina, Florida
Posted on: February 20, 2011 4:14 pm
Edited on: February 20, 2011 4:22 pm
 

Doubt what's possible with Painter? Never again

I had Purdue ranked third in the preseason Top 25 (and one).

Then Robbie Hummel tore his ACL.

Then I dropped the Boilermakers into the 20s. And I never returned them to the top 10 -- not even when they started 15-1, mostly because they had, at the time, zero quality wins. Also worth noting: I could never get over the loss of Hummel because I've spent a lot of time throughout the past year talking to Matt Painter about Hummel as a player and a person, and I know how much that coach values that player. Thus, I couldn't help but put a premium on Hummel, too. But in properly valuing Hummel I made the mistake of inadvertently undervaluing Painter, and that's a mistake that was highlighted with Wednesday's 70-62 win over Wisconsin and again during Sunday's 76-63 victory over Ohio State.

Consider this my mea culpa.

I was wrong about what's possible for the Boilermakers.

I was wrong because -- though I've always properly loved E'Twaun Moore -- I misjudged how good JaJuan Johnson would be this season and underestimated what Painter could do with a roster robbed of its perceived most important player. After Hummel's injury, I figured the Boilermakers would finish fifth in the Big Ten. But after Sunday's win over Ohio State, they're 22-5 overall, 11-3 in the Big Ten and second in the league standings.

Purdue couldn't finish fifth now if it lost each of its remaining games.

So, yeah, I was wrong.

The Boilermakers would've been great with Hummel.

Everybody knew that.

But what I've learned this week is that they're pretty darn good without him, too -- perhaps Final Four good.
Category: NCAAB
Posted on: January 20, 2011 1:33 am
Edited on: January 20, 2011 7:26 am
 

Purdue's Johnson now in POY race

Every player who flirts with the NBA Draft before returning for his senior season claims three things:
  1. He loves school.
  2. He loves his teammates.
  3. He wants to improve his stock.
I'm genuinely convinced there's a handbook somewhere called "How to properly withdraw from the NBA Draft" -- Mississippi State's Dee Bost has never owned this handbook, by the way -- and that prospects simply highlight sentences from that publication and repeat them when necessary. It's always the same stuff. Help my stock. Raise my stock. Increase my stock. Whatever. But the truth is that most borderline first-round picks who return to school raise their stock very little, if at all, because borderline pros usually remain borderline pros in this sport.

Purdue's JaJuan Johnson might be the exception, though.

At the very least, he looks like it.

"JaJuan is very confident," Purdue coach Matt Painter told reporters late Wednesday after Johnson made an 18-footer to give the Boilermakers a 63-62 win over Penn State. "I would say that's his last step in his development. He's skilled. He's athletic. He can run. He's coachable. He's fun to be around. He's unselfish. [And] now he's confident."

I saw this firsthand over the weekend when I attended Purdue-West Virginia, and I was blown away by how Johnson's game has changed. The 6-foot-10 forward was taking and making jumpers, and he seemed comfortable and confident the entire time. He finished with 27 points points and six rebounds in that narrow loss, then backed it with a 25-point effort against Penn State late Wednesday that lifted his scoring average to 20.5 points per game while further legitimizing him as a serious National Player of the Year candidate.

So how much has Johnson raised his NBA stock this season?

Honestly, I'm not sure.

But he's raised his profile tremendously, already.

And that was always gonna be the first step in this process.
Category: NCAAB
Posted on: November 29, 2010 4:03 pm
Edited on: November 29, 2010 7:06 pm
 

The Poll Attacks

One guy left Villanova and Michigan State off his ballot but put Purdue and Virginia Tech in the top 20. Another guy ranked Villanova in the top 10 (that's reasonable) but left the undefeated team that just beat Villanova unranked (that's unreasonable). Silly AP voters, I tell you. They're the gift that keeps on giving during this holiday season.

Let's do the Poll Attacks!

(Details of AP ballots courtesy of PollSpeak.com.)

Associated Press poll: Michigan State and Villanova are both talented, and both only have one loss to a team ranked in the top 15 of the latest AP poll. The Spartans are 5-1 with a loss to No. 7 Connecticut by one possession, and they have a win over No. 23 Washington. The Wildcats are 5-1 with a loss to No. 13 Tennessee, and they've got a double-digit win over UCLA. So we can argue about whether Michigan State and Villanova belong in the top five or the top 10 or even the top 20, I guess. But there is no sensible way to leave either school off a Top 25 ballot.

And yet John Shinn from the Norman Transcript in Oklahoma left both off his AP ballot.

Seriously.

No Michigan State.

No Villanova.

But John has Purdue (no good wins and a double-digit loss to unranked Richmond) ranked 14th and two-loss Virginia Tech ranked 19th, which is three spots higher than the undefeated UNLV team that just beat Virginia Tech on a neutral court by 12. So to recap: Michigan State is 5-1 with a loss to the team ranked No. 8 (UConn) and a win over the team ranked No. 23 (Washington), and John decided that resume isn't worthy of being ranked. And Villanova is 5-1 with a lone loss to the team ranked No. 13 and a win over UCLA, and John decided that resume isn't worthy of being ranked, either. Meantime, Virginia Tech is 4-2 with double-digit losses to the teams ranked No. 5 and No. 24, but John somehow decided that resume is worthy of being ranked all the way up at No. 19, which, again, is three spots higher than the undefeated UNLV team that just beat Virginia Tech on a neutral court by 12. And he has Purdue at No. 14 with a 5-1 record featuring a double-digit loss to unranked Richmond.

Also ranked on John's ballot: North Carolina at No. 25.

So two-loss Virginia Tech and two-loss UNC are both on John's ballot.

But one-loss Michigan State and one-loss Villanova are both off John's ballot.

Perhaps he's just an ACC fan trapped in Big 12 country.

Who knows?

Another weird ballot involving Villanova belongs to Whitelaw Reid of the Daily Progress in Virginia. He has Villanova at No. 8 and Tennessee unranked despite the fact that UT is undefeated with a win over -- wait for it -- Villanova. Not sure how anybody could make sense of that. But this is the same guy who has Washington at No. 12 and Connecticut at No. 23 despite the fact that Washington has two losses and UConn is undefeated with wins over both of the schools (Kentucky and Michigan State) that beat -- wait for it -- Washington. So maybe making sense isn't a priority with good ol' Whitelaw.

Coaches poll: Nobody likes Temple more than I like Temple.

I had the Owls ranked in the top 15 in the preseason, and as high as No. 13 last week. But then they lost to California late Thursday and to Texas A&M on Sunday, and you just can't have a 3-2 team coming off losses to Cal and Texas A&M on your Top 25 ballot. But that's exactly what at least one coach -- and possibly multiple coaches -- did this week. Temple got five points in the coaches poll. That's five more than Texas A&M (5-1) or Cal (3-2) received, case you were wondering.
Posted on: October 28, 2010 9:16 am
 

No surprise in Big Ten media poll

The Big Ten announced Thursday that media members who cover the league have voted Michigan State as the preseason favorite and MSU point guard Kalin Lucas as the Player of the Year. My ballot would've featured Michigan State as the favorite and Ohio State freshman Jared Sullinger as the Player of the Year. But Lucas -- a veteran from a team that's made two straight Final Fours -- is certainly the more conventional pick for Player of the Year. So the announcement doesn't really come as a surprise.

Worth noting: Ohio State was picked second, Purdue third.

So the Big Ten media only dropped the Boilermakers one spot because of Robbie Hummel's injury.

Again, it's not what I'd do.

But it's certainly a reasonable way to vote.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com