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Tag:Oklahoma State
Posted on: March 11, 2011 2:25 am
 

Thursday Wrap-up

NEW YORK -- Kemba Walker was terrific.

UAB was not.

Here's Thursday's Wrap-up to recap a busy day of college basketball.

Best game: Kemba Walker began things by delivering the shot of the postseason -- and possibly the entire season -- to give Connecticut a 76-74 victory over Pittsburgh and propel himself into Madison Square Garden lore. The New York kid wowed the New York crowd with a stepback jumper at the buzzer that got Pitt's Gary McGhee so crossed he'll likely refuse to ever again switch on a ball screen. Yes, it was that bad. And that great. Suddenly, Kemba at MSG is the best show going. A date with Syracuse in Friday's Big East semifinals is on deck.
 
Other best game: Kansas missed 20 of 25 3-point attempts against Oklahoma State and needed the Cowboys to miss a heave at the buzzer to escape with a 63-62 win in the Big 12 quarterfinals. Tyrel Reed and Brady Morningstar combined to go 2 of 14 from 3-point range for the Jayhawks. So on second thought, this wasn't really one of the best games in terms of beautiful basketball. But it was close. And close is usually fun.

Team whose dream remained alive: Colorado proved "it's hard to beat a team three times in a season" is among the dumbest things dumb people say by beating Kansas State for the third time this season. The Buffaloes have now beaten the Wildcats by scores of 74-66, 58-56 and, most recently, 87-75. So the third time was actually the easiest of all three times … and probably enough to ensure Colorado receives an at-large bid regardless of what happens against Kansas in Friday's Big 12 semifinals.

Team whose dream was crushed: UAB had a questionable resume despite winning Conference USA and entered the league tournament with work to do. Unfortunately for Mike Davis, the Blazers did not do the required work. They instead lost 75-70 to East Carolina in the C-USA quarterfinals. Where I'm from, that's called locking down an NIT bid.

Performance I hope you witnessed: Ben Hansbrough's 23-point, seven-assist effort in Notre Dame's 89-51 blowout of Cincinnati wasn't as highlight-worthy as Walker's memorable outing, but it was still an impressive performance for the Big East Player of the Year. Hansbrough was 8-of-11 from the field and 5-of-5 from the free throw line. He's the main reason why the Irish have gone from unranked in the preseason to the verge of a No. 1 seed in the NCAA tournament.

Performance I hope you missed: Jackson Emery took nine 3-pointers and missed eight of them. That's not a violation of BYU's Honor Code, but it ought to be. Yes, the Cougars overcame a halftime deficit and beat TCU 64-58 in the Mountain West quarters. But what they really did is provide another 40-minute sample that suggests they miss Brandon Davies just as much as most anticipated, and that's going to be an issue come Selection Sunday.

Three other things worth noting

1. Southern California's 70-56 victory over California means the Trojans have an opportunity to get a sixth top-50 win in Friday's Pac-10 semifinals against Arizona. But would that be enough? Honestly, I'm not sure. Because though the Trojans have better wins than most bubble teams, they also have worse losses -- specifically three outside of the top 200. My advice: Go for the automatic bid, Kevin O'Neill, just to be safe.

2. St. John's suffered more than a 79-73 loss to Syracuse in the Big East quarters. The Red Storm also lost D.J. Kennedy to a torn ACL that ended his season prematurely and will send Steve Lavin's team into the NCAA tournament short a key contributor. Kennedy was averaging 10.7 points and 5.7 rebounds per game.

3. Washington State's Klay Thompson returned from his one-game suspension and dropped 43 points in an 89-87 loss to Washington. So Thompson was high -- or at least in a car with a substance you use to get high -- last Thursday and the nation's highest scorer this Thursday. That's impressive.

Final thought: No team has ever lost its conference tournament opener and gone on to win the NCAA tournament.

You've heard that before, right?

You heard it when Pittsburgh lost to Connecticut, didn't you?

Of course you did. We all did. And though it's a statement that's 100 percent true, it's also misleading because it fails to recognize that we've never had a league as large and strong as the Big East that requires a true national title contender to open its league tournament with a game against a team the caliber of Connecticut. Bottom line, there are plenty of reasons to think Pitt won't win a national championship. But the fact that the Panthers lost to a nationally ranked UConn team on a ridiculous stepback jumper from an All-American on Thursday shouldn't be among them.
Posted on: January 8, 2011 7:28 pm
Edited on: January 8, 2011 7:32 pm
 

Life on the road isn't easy, even for good teams

A Saturday schedule with just one game between ranked schools seemed boring on the surface.

That's why I stayed home this weekend.

If only No. 9 Missouri, No. 10 Kentucky, No. 17 Kansas State, No. 18 Michigan State, No. 19 UCF and No. 22 Vanderbilt could've done the same. Maybe then they wouldn't be six ranked teams that just endured losses to unranked teams in hostile environments. Yes, it was one of those days in college basketball. Every time I flipped the channel some ranked team was going down on the road. The result was an afternoon of court-stormings, and Sunday night's Top 25 (and one) is sure to be a shuffled mess.

For those who missed it, here you go:
  • Colorado 89, No. 9 Missouri 76
  • Georgia 77, No. 10 Kentucky 70
  • Oklahoma State 76, No. 17 Kansas State 62
  • Penn State 66, No. 18 Michigan State 62
  • Houston 76, No. 19 UCF 71
  • South Carolina 83, No. 22 Vanderbilt 75 (OT)
Georgia is the only unranked team of that bunch that'll likely break into the updated rankings, so let's not pretend this is the day that validates Penn State, Colorado, Oklahoma State, Houston or South Carolina. Yes, Colorado (12-4) and Oklahoma State (13-2) are both solid. But Saturday's results say less about them than they say about how difficult it is, even for nationally ranked teams, to go on the road and win in conference play.

(Worth noting: No. 4 Syracuse nearly lost Saturday at Seton Hall, and Seton Hall is 7-9.)

No. 6 San Diego State, No. 13 Georgetown and No. 20 Illinois are among the ranked teams on the road against unranked teams next Saturday. My advice: Don't be shocked -- or even mildly surprised -- if some of them (or all of them) experience the same fate that Missouri, UK, KSU, Michigan State, UCF and Vandy experienced this Saturday. If it happens, it won't necessarily mean they were overrated. It'll just mean they had to travel.
Posted on: December 27, 2010 4:02 pm
Edited on: December 27, 2010 4:11 pm
 

The Poll Attacks

You want to punish Tom Izzo for scheduling aggressively?

Fine.

But now look. You're in the Poll Attacks.

(Details of AP ballots courtesy of PollSpeak.com.)

Associated Press poll: I have Michigan State ranked 15th in the Top 25 (and one).

The Spartans are 20th in the AP poll.

Both rankings are reasonable. But what's unreasonable is leaving the Spartans completely off a Top 25 ballot, which is what 13 AP voters did, and I don't understand why. Is it because they've suffered four losses against a ridiculous schedule? Because if that's the reason, that's a stupid reason. And, yes, I can explain. But let's first look at the losses.

They are to:
  • No. 1 Duke on the road
  • No. 4 Connecticut on a neutral court
  • No. 5 Syracuse on a neutral court
  • No. 13 Texas at home
I admit, that's not ideal. It's not what I expected (or what Izzo expected, either). But those are games most teams, if not all teams, ranked between 15th and 25th would also lose, point being that to punish Michigan State for losing those games is to punish Izzo for scheduling aggressively, and that's not right. Given the way some writers vote, Izzo could've scheduled a bunch of buy games, cruised and remained ranked in everybody's top five. But he instead decided to challenge his team and create some interesting matchups in November and December, and I'm not going to penalize him for doing it.

But who has Michigan State beaten, you ask?

Washington, for starters.

The Spartans have a neutral-court win over Washington.

So that means Michigan State has a win over the Pac-10 favorite and losses to four top 13 teams, and 13 writers somehow determined that the Spartans' body of work is unworthy of a Top 25 vote. It's dumb on the surface but even dumber when you dig deeper. This being the Poll Attacks, I dug deeper. And Gary Laney from The Advocate in Louisiana is going to wish I wouldn't have because his ballot is bogus.

He has Cincinnati ranked 22nd.

Now I could spend the next few sentences explaining how the Bearcats would likely have more than four losses if they played Michigan State's schedule and how the Spartans would probably be undefeated if they played Cincinnati's schedule, but I'm not going to do that. Instead, I'm going to tell you that Gary has Washington ranked 24th. That's fine with me in general because Washington's body of work is similar to Michigan State's. Washington is 8-3 instead of 9-4. But all three losses are to good teams -- specifically No. 11 Kentucky, No. 18 Texas A&M and No. 20 Michigan State. Yes, Michigan State. Michigan State beat Washington in the Maui Invitational, which is why Gary's ballot makes no sense.

How can you rank Washington but not rank Michigan State?

They have comparable losses, sure. But Washington has no good wins, and one of Washington's losses is to Michigan State. I mean, that's pretty basic stuff, right? I imagine it is to most, but it's not to Gary Laney. Or to Steven Bradley from The Journal in South Carolina. He has Washington 19th and Michigan State unranked. (Perhaps he's never heard of Maui. Who knows?) And then there's J.P. Butler from the Olean Times in New York. He didn't rank Michigan State but he has Baylor 21st even though Baylor has no good wins and three losses to unranked teams.

Question: If Baylor is 8-3 with no good wins and losses to unranked Gonzaga, unranked Washington State and unranked Florida State, what do you think the Bears would be if they had played a 13-game schedule featuring matchups with No. 1 Duke, No. 4 UConn, No. 5 Syracuse and No. 13 Texas?

Answer: A four-loss team, at least.

Steve DeShazo of the Free Lance-Star in Virginia?

He has Michigan State unranked, too. But he's got Oklahoma State at No. 23 and Cleveland State at No. 25 even though Oklahoma State is 11-1 with no good wins and a loss to unranked Virginia Tech while Cleveland State is 13-1 with no good wins and a double-digit loss to unranked West Virginia. So I guess the lesson is this: If you want Steve to notice you, schedule weak, win a lot of games against bums and lose to an unranked team. But don't you dare schedule aggressively a lose games to ranked opponents, because that'll get you dropped real fast.

Whatever.

Let's move on.

Coaches poll: As you can probably tell by the above Poll Attack, I hate voters who highlight teams simply for building records against weak opponents. It rewards a conservative approach, and I'm against that. So shame on the coaches who put Cincinnati (24 points), Oklahoma State (11 points) and Utah State (four points) on their ballots. I've already told you about Cincinnati (no good wins) and Oklahoma State (no good wins and one bad loss). Now let me tell you about Utah State, the WAC school that's 11-2 with no good wins. Granted, the Aggies' losses (to BYU and Georgetown) are better than OSU's losses (or Baylor's losses, for that matter). But there's not even a decent win on their resume. Thus, Utah State shouldn't be getting votes even though Utah State probably deserves votes as much as Cincinnati deserves votes, and more than Oklahoma State deserves votes. The point is that none of them deserve votes. Stacking wins against bad teams is nothing more than stacking wins against bad teams. It's fine for a school that projected to be strong in the preseason because you can still believe in what you thought you knew. But a gaudy record against a weak schedule should never make you start believing in somebody, which is why I won't start believing in Cincinnati, Cleveland State, Utah State or Oklahoma State until at least one of them records one win against a quality opponent. It would be nice if coaches who vote in the coaches poll did the same.
Posted on: October 25, 2010 2:02 pm
 

Oklahoma State's locker room > Your house

Oklahoma State's Mike Cobbins, Brian Williams and Markel Brown conducted a tour of the basketball team's locker rooms and posted it on YouTube, and if you're one of those who believes there's too much of an emphasis placed on athletics at public universities you'd be wise to stop reading now.

The thing cost $4 million.

I'll let ESPN.com's Eamonn Brennan describe it.
The locker room comes complete with OSU logo bathrobes, which you can see gracing the bodies of Cowboys freshmen and video tour leaders Mike Cobbins, Brian Williams and Markel Brown. There's also height-sensitive hair dryers, marble staircases, illuminated locker-room nameplates, a lounge that looks like over-the-top nice mod-themed Las Vegas nightclub, some weird orange plating on the walls, and flat screen televisions in every nook and cranny available. Which means it's exactly what you thought it would be when you heard the words "$4 million locker room." It's really, really nice. It's also really, really silly.
Click this link to check it out.

You'll no longer wonder why today's athletes often seem entitled.

You'll also be jealous.
Category: NCAAB
Posted on: February 12, 2010 1:03 pm
Edited on: February 12, 2010 1:06 pm
 

Sean Sutton arrested, admits addiction to pills


Former Oklahoma State coach Sean Sutton was arrested Thursday in Stillwater on complaints of attempting to possess controlled and dangerous substances, the Tulsa World is reporting.

Sutton remained jailed Friday morning.

Charges are expected to be filed later Friday.

According to an Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics spokesman, Sutton admitted to agents that he's addicted to pain killers. The report claims that Sutton tried to obtain drugs from several doctors by fraudulent means, and through shipments from the states of Washington and New York.

Sutton coached Oklahoma State for two full seasons from 2006 to 2008.

He led the Cowboys to the NIT both seasons.
Category: NCAAB
Posted on: December 20, 2009 11:29 am
Edited on: December 20, 2009 11:31 am
 

I hear the drive to Waco is beautiful


ARLINGTON, Texas -- I was at Texas-North Carolina at Cowboys Stadium on Saturday. Now it's Sunday, and I'm headed to UT-Arlington vs. Baylor in Waco. Then I'll be at a double-header -- UTEP vs. Oklahoma/La Salle vs. Oklahoma State -- in Oklahoma City on Monday. Then I'll be in Austin on Tuesday for Michigan State vs. Texas, where I hope to see whether Rick Barnes can figure out a way to play 24 different Longhorns at least five minutes.

Anyway, busy times.

I'm leaving for Waco now.

It'll be my first trip to the Ferrell Center.

I hope it has a 60-yard-long television, just like the one I saw yesterday.
Category: NCAAB
Posted on: September 21, 2009 8:07 am
Edited on: September 21, 2009 8:09 am
 

Recruiting notes from the weekend


Cameron Clark committing to Oklahoma wasn't the only recruiting development from this weekend.

Here are some others:

Rivers visits Duke: Class of 2011 star Austin Rivers visited Duke despite supposedly being committed to Florida. As Bruce Weber can attest -- you haven't forgotten the Eric Gordon recruitment, have you? -- there is no way to interpret this as a good thing for the Gators. Rivers taking that visit makes him by definition no longer genuinely committed to Florida, and it's only a matter of time before he acknowledges as much publicly. Scout.com ranks Rivers as the No. 4 prospect in the Class of 2011. He is the son of Celtics coach Doc Rivers

Wroten tears ACL: While Rivers was touring Cameron Indoor Stadium, fellow Class of 2011 star Tony Wroten Jr. was tearing his ACL in a football game, according to the Seattle Times . The paper reported that Wroten will have surgery this week and need seven-to-nine months of rehab, meaning he's done with football and basketball for the year. Scout.com ranks Wroten as the No. 8 prospect in the Class of 2011.

Quick hitters: Stacey Poole, a 6-foot-5 wing from Florida, told Scout.com that he'll likely pick between Kentucky and South Carolina by the end of the week. Poole is ranked 58th in the Class of 2010. ... Kyrie Irving, ranked fifth in the Class of 2010, eliminated Indiana from his list of possible destinations. The New Jersey point guard is still considering Duke, Kentucky, Georgia Tech and Texas A&M. ... One of the nation's top junior college prospects, J.P. Olukemi, committed to Oklahoma state. He's the fourth OSU commitment for the Class of 2010.
Posted on: September 14, 2009 11:19 pm
 

Elite wing from Texas names three finalists


Cameron Clark trimmed his list to three schools Monday night, according to Scout.com.

They are:
  • Marquette
  • Oklahoma
  • Oklahoma State
Clark is a 6-foot-6 wing from Sherman, Texas.

Scout.com ranks him as the 30th-best prospect in the Class of 2010.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com