Blog Entry

Failing to monitor is the key to success

Posted on: May 28, 2010 11:52 am
Edited on: May 28, 2010 12:00 pm
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The best part is that Jim Calhoun was hit with a "failure to monitor" charge.

That's exacty the point of my column.

The worst any head coach should ever endure is a "failure to monitor" charge because that translates roughly into a "you didn't pay close enough attention to your cheating assistants" charge, or a "you didn't pay close enough attention to realize your players were taking extra benefits from an agent" charge. Either way, you're good. Because, like I wrote in the column, the key at the highest level of college basketball is to stay far enough away from the bad stuff to survive if the bad stuff ever comes to light.

A failure to monitor is almost necessary.

Failing to monitor allows your assistants to do what needs to be done, allows your players to take what needs to be taken. Just cover your eyes and ears and cash the big paychecks. And if the you-know-what hits the fan, answer as many questions as possible with "I don't know" or "I don't recall," and the worst you get is a failure-to-monitor charge.

The NABC should offer a class on this approach.

Coaching 101: How failing to monitor can be your friend
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Category: NCAAB
Comments

Since: May 8, 2009
Posted on: June 1, 2010 12:29 pm
 

Failing to monitor is the key to success

mike freeman is a proven liar
http://www.poynter.org/dg.lts/id.45

/aid.59093/column.htm



Since: Dec 15, 2008
Posted on: May 28, 2010 2:40 pm
 

Failing to monitor is the key to success

The best part is that Jim Calhoun was hit with a "failure to monitor" charge. Why is this the best part again?  Shouldn't it be the sad part? 



Since: Apr 19, 2010
Posted on: May 28, 2010 1:35 pm
 

Failing to monitor is the key to success

Well Calhoun isn't exactly the pinnacle of morality. I'm sure he knows what is happening around him. Any guy that would let players still play a season when they steal laptops has to be a little bit comprimised. It's amazing that someone like Calipari gets a bad rap for whatever things he has or hasn't done (who knows) yet Calhoun is without a blemish.



Since: Sep 4, 2006
Posted on: May 28, 2010 11:56 am
 

Failing to monitor is the key to success

But failing to monitor is a violation. Can't the NCAA just start giving overly harsh punishments for that? I know it's not likely to happen, but that's the only way to counteract this garbage.


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